Tag Archives: babel

sigh no more, camden

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As told in Rolling Stone‘s recent Mumford & Sons story, “The members of Mumford & Sons have no trouble saying sorry.  ‘We’re not, like, hard men,’ Marshall says.  ‘We’re emotional, weeping pussies.  We’re not, like, rock and roll.  If AC/DC had ever apologized, that’d be the end of their career.'”

If you haven’t read that story, I highly suggest you do because you’ll learn every band members’ strengths, and their weaknesses (of being weak) as a band.  You’ll also learn why the second album, Babel, sounds very similar to their first, Sigh No More.  If you listen closely,  every song tells a different story; they are much more instrumentally sound on Babel.  This is what it is like to be an artist.  It’s the same reason why painter Mark Rothko’s work is a variation of another.  It’s important for everyone who says that “every song sounds the same” to understand that they were simply not ready to stop making the music they wanted to make.  Why would they stop if it sounds so good?

The sold out show at Susquehanna Bank Center in Camden on February 16, was a w e s o m e.  Mumford & Sons have some Jersey mojo because when I thought their kickoff show in Hoboken was outstanding, they just had to put on another outstanding show in South Jersey.  Haim opened the show for Ben Howard who preceded Mumford.  Haim, a band of sisters, didn’t do it for me, although many of the Philly hipsters were thrilled to see their dramatic performance.  While I favor this tribal-drum-beating trend that was featured in all three sets, words can’t explain how nice it was to have Ben Howard break up the night.  Actually, they can: he was a breath of fresh air.  You should probably listen to him right now.  Or I’ll make you in my next post.

It’s easy to lose yourself in Mumford’s songs when Marcus Mumford seems to be pouring his heart and soul out, confessing his rage, and passionately apologizing for being incredibly attractive and good and what he does.  Well, maybe I exaggerated the latter, but every word he sings he sings to me and you and the person who inspired the song.  When you sing along, you feel like every word you sing is to that person (and maybe to Marcus, too).  Like they said in Rolling Stone, they have no problem apologizing.

The night ended with an encore of Bruce Springsteen’s “Atlantic City.”  Everyone poured back on stage: Mumford with Marcus at the drums, Ben (who I think was MIA), Haim, and all of the outstanding string and horn accompaniments.  Imagine a packed bar down the shore around closing time.  Everyone has their last beer of the night in one hand and someone else in the other.  Well, this bar was a few thousand deep.  Blissful, everyone bounced up and down, sloppily shouting the words to a New Jersey anthem.  Bruce’s song or not, that’s how every Mumford & Sons show ends…with a smile on your face.  Sorry I’m not sorry.

-j

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I never lived a year better spent in love

If you haven’t listened to new Mumford & Sons, your life hasn’t started yet.  They pulled off a sophomore album with flying colors and then some.  My favorite song (which is a lofty statement because I could probably say that about every song on the damn album) is Babel.  Give it a listen and enjoy.  a

 

 

Tagged ,

summer sunset

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Wednesday, August 1st was dreary, hot, and humid.  The humidity broke when rain hit the East Coast up until minutes before show time.  And just like that, the skies cleared and there was the most picturesque sunset for the kickoff of Mumford and Son‘s month long U.S. tour.  Having never performed in Jersey, the British group made their first time memorable by playing an outdoor concert at Hoboken’s Pier A Park.  It’s no wonder the show was sold out to 15,000 fans in a matter of a few hours.  Other than the unique talent, the views of the Manhattan skyline were breathtaking–and the sunset was a gift with purchase.

The quartet has a choir before them as they cheerfully played “Winter Winds,” “Little Lion Man,” and “White Blank Page” (during which I would bet Marcus shed a tear…or was that me?) from their first album Sigh No More.   Between praising the vibe of the venue and boasting the site of the Olympic Games, Marcus Mumford, Ben Lovett, Winston Marshall, and Ted Dwane were eager to share several songs off of their new album, Babel. (due September 24th!!!!)  Much to our surprise, Marcus put down his guitar and assumed position at the drums.  The newer songs are more rock than folk as you will notice a heavy focus on the drums and electric guitar.

As the show came to a close, the men thanked Hoboken native, Frank Sinatra with a rendition of “New York, New York,” not to be slighted by a cover of Paul Simon’s “The Boxer.”  It was eerie how they could manipulate the energy of some 15,000 people.  Not moment before we all were stopped dead in our tracks at the opening of “The Boxer” were we all jumping around like drunks at a jamboree.

A surge of energy spread across the sea of people, again, as Mumford and Sons concluded the show with harmonious melodies of “The Cave” beneath fireworks.

-j

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: